Albert Einstein

Happy Birthday, Albert Einstein! Paintings by Austrian artist Werner Horvath.

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Niccolo Machiavelli

Werner Horvath: “Niccolo Machiavelli – The Prince”. Oil on canvas, 2002.

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This painting is the cover-image of the book “Niccolo Machiavelli – Der Fürst”, RaBaKa-Publishing, ISBN: 978-3-940185-05-1, 2007.
It is included in “Worldviews: Contact and Change” by A.Fitton, D.M.Goodman and E. O’Connor, a Grade 8 social studies textbook published by Pearson Education, Toronto, Canada, ISBN 978-0-13-198719-7, 2007.
It is also published in “politik & kommunikation”, a political magazine by Helios Media, illustrating the article “Sei Löwe, sei Fuchs!” by Marco Althaus (Berlin, September 2008) and in the magazine “Charakter”, March 2010, illustrating the article “Das Phänomen der Macht” by Vanessa Pegel (Göttingen).

Thomas Hobbes

Werner Horvath: “Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan”. Oil on canvas, 50 x 40 cm, 2001.

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Emanuel Adler, the Andrea and Charles Bronfman Professor of Israeli Studies at the University of Toronto and Professor of International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, writes about this particular picture: “…a community of people, weaved into the face of the ‘father’ of International Relations, just like Leviathan’s face in Hobbes’ book.” He chose this picture as cover-illustration for his new book “Communitarian International Relations – The epistemic foundations of International Relations”, Routledge, New York 2005, ISBN.0-415-33590-6 (simultaneously published in the USA and Canada).

Friedrich Nietzsche

Werner Horvath: “Friedrich Nietzsche – the Three Metamorphoses”. Oil on canvas, 50 x 40 cm.
“Of the three metamorphoses of the spirit I tell you: how the spirit becomes a camel; and the camel, a lion; and the lion, finally, a child.”

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This painting was the official image for the programme and the poster of the international congress “Nietzsche y la hermeneutica”, held at the University of Valencia from Nov.5th to Nov.7th, 2007. It is also placed at the cover of the book “Nietzsche y la hermeneutica” by Francisco Arenas-Dolz, Luca Giancristofaro and Paolo Stellino (ISBN13: 978-84-7642-744-8).This painting was also published in the magazine “Educação” (http://revistaeducacao.uol.com.br/ ), ISSN 1415-5486, special edition on Friedrich Nietzsche, published by Editora Segmento, in São Paulo, Brazil, 2007.
This painting is also piblished in “The Hedgehog Review – Critical Reflections on Contemporary Culture” Volume 17, Number 3, Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, University of Virginia, in an article by Matthew Scherer: “Nietzshe’s Smile”. ISSN 1527-867X, Charlottesville 2015.

Empedocles and the Four Elements

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Werner Horvath: “The pre-Socratic Philosopher Empedocles and the Four Elements” – Oil on canvas, 100 x 70 cm, 2016

Empedocles was a Greek pre-Socratic philosopher and a citizen of Agrigentum, a Greek city in Sicily. Empedocles’ philosophy is best known for originating the cosmogenic theory of the four classical elements. He also proposed forces he called Love and Strife which would mix as well as separate the elements. These physical speculations were part of a history of the universe which also dealt with the origin and development of life. (Wikipedia)

The four elements are Fire, Earth, Water and Air. His theory of developmment of life can be seen as an early theory of evolution.

Influenced by the Pythagoreans, Empedocles was a vegetarian who supported the doctrine of reincarnation. He is generally considered the last Greek philosopher to have recorded his ideas in verse. Some of his work survives, more than is the case for any other pre-Socratic philosopher. Empedocles’ death was mythologized by ancient writers (suicide in Mount Etna?), and has been the subject of a number of literary treatments.

“There are forces in nature called Love and Hate. The force of Love causes elements to be attracted to each other and to be built up into some particular form or person, and the force of Hate causes the decomposition of things.”

This painting is the middle part of a triptych entitled “Pre-Socratic Philosophers and the Four Elements”:

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Peace Heroes Walk Vienna

I am very happy that I could accompany the “Peace Heroes Walk Vienna” with my pictures! The route led from Stephansplatz to the university, the mood was great. My special thanks go to Dr. Klaus Renoldner, President of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, as well as to Liska Blodgett and Ali Ahmad, both Peace Museum Vienna.

Werner Horvath

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